Category Archives: Nature

The Interaction Of Natural And Human-Made Beauty.

String Circle On Leaves ©2000 Gloria Lamson

String Circle On Leaves ©2000 Gloria Lamson

Gloria Lamson’s photos have been an intriguing addition to Le Fotografie. She plays with nature, but it’s not so much a manipulation as a subtle, thought-provoking rearrangement. Her images force the viewer to consider notions of natural and human-made beauty, and the possibilities for interaction between the two.

At first glance, String Circle on Leaves is jarring. The string seems an imposition, almost, albeit a pretty one. But I’ve done some careful pondering, and I think the string and leaves are a natural pairing, both visually and conceptually.

There are two levels of organization within the plant. On the micro level, we’ve got the neat, orderly parallel lines of the creases of the leaves. Very tidy. At the macro level, we’ve got the opposite—the tangled jumble of the leaves themselves, seemingly without order. These work together to emphasize different aspects of the mini string installation. The radial arrangement of the cotton appears organized and messy at once. The frayed, meandering string ends are in contrast with the orderly neatness of the veins within the leaves. And the large scale haphazard arrangement of the fronds function to push the careful weaving of the center to the visual forefront.

Lamson has done something very interesting with this installation. She’s essentially taken a processed bit of nature—the string having come from a cotton plant, of course—and laid it over a bit of “pure” nature. It’s a lovely and provocative take on a before and after shot, a lens through which to view the age-old dichotomy of humans and nature. She’s given us visual and symbolic layers that make for a fascinating romp through this issue.

Erin Weber Carlman
The Untrained Eye

About Erin Carlman Weber as “The Untrained Eye”
Erin Carlman Weber likes food so much that she tracked down and enrolled in a graduate program at Boston University that’s comprised entirely of talking, thinking and reading about food, with a liberal sprinkling of eating and cooking, too. What does that have to do with photography? Well, she also enjoys a good photograph every now and then, since one cannot live on food alone. (Or can you? Erin will have to check on that…) She is a freelance writer and a contributor to The Urban Grocer and Leite’s Culinaria and has been writing for Le Fotografie since October 2010. But I’m not sure how long we’re going to be able to keep calling her “The Untrained Eye” since she’s starting to get pretty good at writing about things that aren’t food.

-Ed Riddell
Curator, Le Fotografie

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Filed under Color, Conceptual Art, Fine Art Photography, Fine Art Prints, Intimate Landscape, Le Fotografie Images, Nature

“Fire!” Fortunately, it’s not a crowded room.

House On Fire ©2010 Bob Hills

House On Fire ©2010 Bob Hills

This is a startling image, mostly because the title’s not just a clever name. Bob Hills’ decision to call it House on Fire is quite apt. A couple of people have walked by while I’ve been sitting with my review copy of this photo, and their reactions were identical. “Whoa. That house looks like it’s on fire.” Yes. Yes, it does.

The trompe l’oeil of this rock formation and ancient dwelling is something else, and Bob Hills captured it at the exact right moment. The fiery effect is a combination of variation in the orange-y red hues that make up the rock itself and perfect timing with regard to the light. He snapped this shot just as the sunlight burst in on the right side of the frame and set the rocks above ablaze. (Pun 100 percent intended.) The angle is key for the illusion, too. The lines in the rock rush straight overhead, making it seem all the more flame-like. If Hills had positioned himself even a little bit downhill, the effect would be one of impressive geology rather than fiery deception.

This little house seems like a dangerous place to be, all afire and whatnot, but I’d guess it was one of the safer places to set up a homestead back in the day. Since the house and its surroundings are stone, it’s rather flameproof. The irony. Maybe its original inhabitants thought its striking resemblance to a conflagration would keep the baddies away.

Or perhaps they were drawn to it because, as my always perceptive other half pointed out, it also looks a bit like Don King’s hair.

Weber Carlman
The Untrained Eye

About Erin Carlman Weber as “The Untrained Eye”
Erin Carlman Weber likes food so much that she tracked down and enrolled in a graduate program at Boston University that’s comprised entirely of talking, thinking and reading about food, with a liberal sprinkling of eating and cooking, too. What does that have to do with photography? Well, she also enjoys a good photograph every now and then, since one cannot live on food alone. (Or can you? Erin will have to check on that…) She is a freelance writer and a contributor to The Urban Grocer and Leite’s Culinaria and has been writing for Le Fotografie since October 2010. But I’m not sure how long we’re going to be able to keep calling her “The Untrained Eye” since she’s starting to get pretty good at writing about things that aren’t food.

-Ed Riddell
Curator, Le Fotografie

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Filed under Architecture, Color, Fine Art Photography, Fine Art Prints, Intimate Landscape, Nature

Guess What This Is. (And don’t look at the title first.)

Champlain Ice ©2010 Richard J. Murphy

©2010 Richard J. Murphy (No, we're not giving away the title yet!)

Today I bring you a daring feat heretofore never attempted at The Untrained Eye. I shall write a review of this Richard J. Murphy print without knowing its proper name. Gasp!

I’ve written plenty about how the title of a print influences my reading of the image, and it’s still very true 20-odd reviews in. I lean heavily on this cue to tell me what I’m looking at and provide a frame of reference. But not this time. The subject matter seems obvious. I’m thinking we’ve got a line of quartz running through a slab of darker rock. We’ll see how close I am.

This image—let’s call it “Line in Rock” for now—suggests texture and movement where I know there isn’t any, and that’s a pretty good trick. There’s directionality to the grain (do rocks have a grain?) that evokes a range of things that it clearly is not. Bristly animal fur, for one. Or a feeling of looking down into a crevasse during a rainstorm. Up close, the contrast that gives the feeling of movement fades away. The continuity between light and dark is more obvious, which makes it seem like the flat surface I’m assuming it is. (Wouldn’t it be wonderful if this ended up being a shot of a faraway galaxy with a majestic bolt of space lightning running through it? I’d love to be wrong if that were the case.)

The line, remarkable in its bright straightness, also suggests things I assume it cannot be. There’s the aforementioned lightning, but it also resembles a root stretching downward through soil, little filaments branching off in search of moisture. The effect of placing the line slightly right of center deemphasizes the line itself, though it remains a strong element. The asymmetry allows the variations in shape and color of the white flecks a bit more visual prominence and contrast with the line.

Alright. The suspense is killing me. Firing up my browser for a grand reveal of the title, and hopefully a clue about what I’m looking at.

Oh, how wrong I am! It’s called “Champlain Ice.” Quartz, space galaxy, animal fur, roots… See what happens when you leave yourself in the dark for a bit? Opens up a whole world of possibilities.

Erin Weber Carlman
The Untrained Eye

About Erin Carlman Weber as “The Untrained Eye”

Erin Carlman Weber likes food so much that she tracked down and enrolled in a graduate program at Boston University that’s comprised entirely of talking, thinking and reading about food, with a liberal sprinkling of eating and cooking, too. What does that have to do with photography? Well, she also enjoys a good photograph every now and then, since one cannot live on food alone. (Or can you? Erin will have to check on that…) She is a freelance writer and a contributor to The Urban Grocer and Leite’s Culinaria and has been writing for Le Fotografie since October 2010. But I’m not sure how long we’re going to be able to keep calling her “The Untrained Eye” since she’s starting to get pretty good at writing about things that aren’t food.

-Ed Riddell

Curator, Le Fotografie

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Now Available For Viewing. Issue 5 Of Le Fotografie Magazine Featuring The Photography Of John Telford.

Le Fotografie Magazine, Telford

Sample screenshots of Issue #5 of Le Fotografie Magazine featuring the work of photographer John Telford.

SIGN UP FOR A FREE MONTHLY SUBSCRIPTION TO LE FOTOGRAFIE MAGAZINE BY CLICKING THIS LINK.

Issue #5 of Le Fotografie Magazine features some of the most memorable images from photographer John Telford’s more than four decade career. 

Click here to access the new issue in full page view.

Le Fotografie announces the fourth issue of Le Fotografie Magazine devoted exclusively to the images and photographers featured at Le Fotografie. Le Fotografie Magazine is issued on a monthly basis and may be freely viewed through the Our Magazine page at the Le Fotografie web site.

Here’s what you’ll find in the third issue of Le Fotografie Magazine:

  • Beautiful reproductions of some of John Telford’s most memorable black & white and color images.
  • Photographic tips and ideas about what makes a particular photo “work.”
  • Information about John Telford’s professional career and his philosophy about photography.
  • Insights about selected photographs including some of the reasons why particular images were selected to be featured at Le Fotografie.
  • Links to purchase the featured images by simply clicking on the image in the magazine.
  • Information about what differentiates fine art photographs from the many images we see in everyday life.

All this information comes to you completely without charge as our way of promoting a greater understanding of photography as art. As many of you know, Le Fotografie is dedicated to the mission of making beautiful, original prints of images by our talented group of photographers available at amazingly low prices. The prints are not reproductions or “posters.” These are original, custom, made-to-order prints available in sizes from 8×10 to 16×20. Each print bears the Le Fotografie Authorized Special Edition Print imprint and the copyright of the photographer. This “imprint” may be easily covered when framing or matting but stays on the print to attest to its authenticity. To learn more about how these prints are made and why we are undertaking this effort please view the information pages at www.lefotografie.com.

Please help us in our mission of making fine art photographs affordable for everyone by telling your friends about this unique new concept in fine art photography.

Edward Riddell
Curator, Le Fotografie

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Filed under Abstract, Architecture, Black and White, Color, Fine Art Photography, Fine Art Prints, Flowers, Foreign Countries, Grand Landscape, Intimate Landscape, Nature

Check Out Our New Le Fotografie iPad App. It’s Free.

Our new iPad app takes full advantage of the iPads big gorgeous screen and touch navigation.

Photography You Can Live With.
Inspiration For Photographers And Collectors.

Click Here To Learn More Or To Download To Your iPad Via iTunes.

The Le Fotografie iPad App is a curated collection of more than 250 high resolution, fine art photographs from 15 photographers. Images are presented in 14 separate galleries arranged by subject including: Grand Landscapes, Architecture, Foreign Countries, Wildlife, Still Life, Sports And Adventure, Off-The-Wall and others. Each photograph features a description, a photographic tip and a satellite map of its location. The Le Fotografie App will inspire photographers and collectors alike. You may also download the app directly from your iPad by going to the App Store and typing in “Le Fotografie” in the search window.

·BROWSE images by pushpin gallery locations on a worldwide satellite map or by keywords links to all the images in the collection.
·ENHANCE your iPad’s home screen with dozens of images that may be used as wallpaper for your own iPad.
·VIEW slide shows of each gallery or the entire collection.
·READ a short description of each photo.
·LEARN about how each photo was made and improve your own photography with photographic tips specific to each individual photograph in the collection.
·SHOP for original prints at the Le Fotografie on-line gallery which offers affordable fine prints, prints mounted in window mats or prints with mats and frames that are ready to hang.
·LOCATE each image on a pop-up satellite map featuring the location of that specific image.
·ZOOM in on satellite maps and see exactly where each picture was taken.
·INSPIRATION for your own photography.
·START your own photography collection with Le Fotografie’s extremely affordable prints.

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Filed under Abstract, Architecture, Black and White, Color, Conceptual Art, Figure, Fine Art Photography, Fine Art Prints, Flowers, Foreign Countries, Grand Landscape, Intimate Landscape, Italy, Le Fotografie Images, Nature, Portrait, Sports and Adventure, Wildlife

Try Looking At This Image Upside Down.

Black Rod And Salt, Great Salt Lake ©2007 Paul Adams

The horizon line on the right side of the frame in Black Rod and Salt by Paul Adams screams Rorschach inkblot to me.  It appears Paul Adams simply inked up the hills and folded them down, stamping them onto the water. I’m going to have to assume it didn’t happen that way, because although Mr. Adams is a highly capable photographer, I don’t think omnipotence is part of his skill set. You never know, though.

Anyway. To return to Paul Adams’s adeptness with a camera, this is simply a stunning image. It manages to be dreamy and desolate, warm and cold all at once. The fiery lights at either edge confer a sort of magic, almost, on the rest of the frame. The brilliant yellowy-oranges peek out and around the mountains, and are made more dramatic in their perfect reflection and symmetry.

Everything about the image draws the eye to the titular pole in the center of the frame—the “V” of rocky salt clods in the foreground, the narrowing of the reflection on the horizon line, and direction of the clouds overhead. But the rod remains more an anchor point than visual center, I think. As the only rigid, nonorganic shape in the frame, its oddity and oppositeness is spare and unobtrusive, yet indispensable as subtle juxtaposition with the rest of the shot.

The little islands of salt in the water are cloudlike in their shape and arrangement, echoing the clouds above and carrying the notion of reflection and symmetry through the entire image. In fact, order this print and flip it 180 degrees. The effect when viewed this way, with sky and water switched, is a brilliantly spooky echo between the heavens and the lake.

Erin Weber Carlman
The Untrained Eye

About Erin Carlman Weber as “The Untrained Eye”
As a photography geek I was looking for someone with a fresh approach to looking at and writing about photographs. All you have to do is read one of Erin Weber Carlman’s posts to see that I certainly found what I was looking for. Erin likes food so much that she tracked down and enrolled in a graduate program at Boston University that’s comprised entirely of talking, thinking and reading about food, with a liberal sprinkling of eating and cooking, too. What does that have to do with photography? Well, she also enjoys a good photograph every now and then, since one cannot live on food alone. (Or can you? Erin will have to check on that…) She is a freelance writer and a contributor to The Urban Grocer and Leite’s Culinaria and has been writing for Le Fotografie since October 2010. But I’m not sure how long we’re going to be able to keep calling her “The Untrained Eye” since she’s starting to get pretty good at writing about something besides food.

-Ed Riddell
Curator, Le Fotografie

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Filed under Color, Conceptual Art, Fine Art Photography, Fine Art Prints, Grand Landscape, Nature

Now Available For Viewing. Volume 1, Issue 4 of Le Fotografie Magazine featuring the photography of Paul Adams.

 

Screenshot of Volume 1, Issue 4 of Le Fotografie Magazine

Sample pages from the newly released Volume 1, Issue 4 of Le Fotografie Magazine.

SIGN UP FOR A FREE MONTHLY SUBSCRIPTION TO LE FOTOGRAFIE MAGAZINE BY CLICKING THIS LINK.

Issue #4 of Le Fotografie Magazine features the photographs of landscape photographer, Paul Adams. It showcases some of Adams’ most ethereal images in stunning full screen views.

Click here to see the full issue in full page view.

Le Fotografie announces the fourth issue of Le Fotografie Magazine devoted exclusively to the images and photographers featured at Le Fotografie. Le Fotografie Magazine is issued on a monthly basis and may be freely viewed through the Our Magazine page at the Le Fotografie web site .

Here’s what you’ll find in the third issue of Le Fotografie Magazine:

  • Beautiful reproductions of some of Paul Adams’ magical, landscape images.
  • Photographic tips and ideas about what makes a particular photo “work.”
  • Information about Paul Adams’ professional career and his philosophy about photography.
  • Insights about selected photographs including some of the reasons why particular images were selected to be featured at Le Fotografie.
  • Links to purchase the featured images by simply clicking on the image in the magazine.
  • Information about what differentiates fine art photographs from the many images we see in everyday life.

All this information comes to you completely without charge as our way of promoting a greater understanding of photography as art. As many of you know, Le Fotografie is dedicated to the mission of making beautiful, original prints of images by our talented group of photographers available at amazingly low prices. The prints are not reproductions or “posters.” These are original, custom, made-to-order prints available in sizes from 8×10 to 16×20. Each print bears the Le Fotografie Authorized Special Edition Print imprint and the copyright of the photographer. This “imprint” may be easily covered when framing or matting but stays on the print to attest to its authenticity. To learn more about how these prints are made and why we are undertaking this effort please view the information pages at www.lefotografie.com.

Please help us in our mission of making fine art photographs affordable for everyone by telling your friends about this unique new concept in fine art photography.

Edward Riddell
Curator, Le Fotografie

Leave a comment

Filed under Architecture, Black and White, Color, Fine Art Photography, Fine Art Prints, Foreign Countries, Grand Landscape, Italy, Le Fotografie Images, Nature